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Boiler Efficiency Improvement through Linkageless Control

Wednesday, October 6, 2010 - 10:00am
Video: 

We will review how the air/fuel ratio system works on your boiler, and why a “jack shaft” system is inefficient and wastes energy. You will also learn why mechanical linkage systems can be adjusted to match your boilers’ efficiency curve. This webinar will help you understand how the “linkage-less” system works and how to determine if your boilers are a candidate for 4-10 % fuel savings. In addition, we will discuss how to estimate your energy savings and how to get started on a project.

  • How the traditional “jack shaft” mechanical linkage system works
  • Why the “jack shaft” linkage is inefficient and wastes energy
  • What a typical boiler efficiency curve looks like
  • What the “linkage-less” system looks like and how it works
  • Why customers that have upgraded are saving 5% or more on their natural gas/oil bill
  • Actual projects that have been completed, before and after results
  • Other places to save energy in the boiler room

Jennifer:

Good morning everyone and welcome to the webinar. My name is Jennifer and I am the marketing assistant for Industrial Controls. Today's webinar is boiler efficiency improvement through linkageless control presented by John Graham and Chuck Kudy of Industrial Controls. The presentation will take about forty-five minutes and after the presentation we will take some time to answer your questions. During the presentation, though free to enter your questions into the chat interface on the right-hand side of your screen and they will be addressed at the end. We will also open it up to voice questions where you can raise your hand and you will be on muted so you can communicate directly with the speakers. At this time, I will pass the presentation over to Chuck to get us started.

Chuck:

Great, thank you Jen. I really appreciate it. Welcome everybody I appreciate you taking the time out of your day and investing the forty-five minutes this morning to learn a little bit about linkageless controls. Our goal today is to educate you a little bit and help you understand why looking at linkageless controls for your boiler and burners are going to be a good thing for you. So with that what we will do is get started. Today's agenda, what we are going to do is we are going to talk a little bit about linkageless controls. How they save energy and how they can save you money. Talk about our linkageless products that we offer at Industrial Controls here. We will also be looking at an actual installation from beginning to end so that you can visualize and see how the parts and pieces go together and that might spur some questions for you at the end as well. We are going to talk about some other opportunities that you may have in your boiler room for upgrades or changes or updates. We are going to give you a list of questions that you should be thinking about that either are going to be asked of you or you should just be thinking about ready to offer up if this is truly something that you want to look at doing for your boilers and business. And then finally as Jen said the last 10 or 15 minutes we have today, we will be able to answer some questions that you have and if it runs over I will be happy to sit here and answer questions until we are done with it. Without any further ado, we will jump into what linkageless controls are. What will also be doing today as we go through our presentation and we get into the portion of the presentation that talks about the products we carry, we are going to be referencing to our catalog, or reference book. We had about 35,000 of these catalogs and reference books printed about a month and a half ago and we have had them mailed out to customers. So if you have one, feel free to reference to it as we are going through. If you don't have one and would like one, please put a note in the chat that Jen said or please fill free to call that 1-800 number and we will get one sent out to you. The part of the book that we are talking about and we are going to be playing in today, is the combustion area which is the goldish yellow portion at the very top of the catalog. And it is only a sliver of that so there is a lot of really good information in here for your business and for your processes so if you don't have one of these I really highly recommend that you get one as a good reference tool. Pardon me, so we will move on from here.

So we are going to talk about, what is parallel positioning? We are going to be discussing what a jack shaft operation is typically how it is done versus using separate servos on air and gas. So with that, I'm going to pass it over to John Graham here to talk a little bit about that.

John:

Good morning all. So the obvious question at this point is, well, what is a linkage and why do I want to be linkageless? It is a good question and it is very appropriate. Here we are looking at small fire tube boiler from Cleaver Brooks. Very common at least in this part of the country and what she will see is the, hopefully the mouse is showing up here on your end, but there is an actuator here on the left-hand side of the burner dish. That response to the pressure or temperature controller so of course as your steam pressure falls in the boiler, this actuator responds by operating this push rod which operates the jack shaft itself but you'll notice that there is a mechanical takeoff point here for operating the gas control valve. So what happens is as the actuator rotates, it causes the jack shaft to rotate which causes this rod to rise and fall which ultimately repositions the fuel control butterfly. In a similar fashion there is another takeoff point which to the right operates the rotary air damper. Now every burner is typically different. This one internally has got a concentric sleeve over another sleeve. Sorry, the train is coming through. And the rotation of the sleeves causes more or less combustion air to pass into the burner. To the right, as we go across, there it is, here's the mouse. You will find another quadrant which operates our oil control valves. Now in this case, this boiler has only been arranged for firing natural gas so although the manufacturer provided those valves, they are not in service. So you can kind of imagine that as this actuator shaft rotates, this rod moves up and down, all of these linkages now have to move in harmony with the actuator but unfortunately what really happens is two things. There is mechanical hysteresis because these ball joints wear in time over here and over here, here and here. Any other thing is that some boilers aren't fitted with characterizable trim. What that means is you can essentially adjust the fuel flow at every position of the jack shaft so you can maintain a suitable fuel/air ratio when you commission the burner. So in this case it has characterizable trim. Some boilers do not. What it comes down to is it is very difficult to set up with your combustion analyzer certain burner types are. Second thing is you have to allow enough free excess air to maintain stable and safe clean combustion even accounting for the fact that the hysteresis exists in a linkage. So right out of the gate you are starting off with a condition whereby it is less than optimal. If we contrast that to a linkageless system, you will see a Cleaver Brook's boiler again. But here we have a separate servo to operate the rotary air damper and we have another servo down below on the fuel control valve. Now these servos have very fine positional control accuracy meaning that they can actually be returned to their initial position within plus or minus 1/10 of an angular degree. So essentially we eliminate a lot of the slop in the linkage by going into a linkageless solution.

So we look at the old versus the new. On some burners like Gordon-Piatt model, on the top slide you will see a tremendous amount of exposed linkage which is complex in that time it does wear but also it is somewhat tedious to set up as contrasted to be linkageless solution below. On the one below you will see there is a servo for the fuel control. There is one for secondary air sleeve and there is one for the combustion air damper on the back. It has taken advantage of new technology as well that we didn't enjoy twenty years ago and that there was nothing like this at that time so not only do we get rid of the linkage making the setup and maintenance a little easier, we also have the ability to repeat the combustion curve year end and year out. It is very beneficial and minimizing emissions and maximizing efficiency.

Why to use linkageless controls? Well, the obvious answer is to get rid of the linkage being linkageless getting rid of that one foot mounted actuator as we saw on a prior slide on the left. Getting the ability to, in some cases, where Flue Gas recirculation is required for oxygen control getting away from the linkage that can be somewhat tedious with that. We allow more control over the burner. In this case, we can use a milliamp signal to operate as opposed to old 135 ohm or series 90 pressure controls or temperature controls as they were called. Another significant benefit is we can keep the burner on low fire until warm up so we don't actually turn the burner on and allow it to release some modulation which will typically take it high fire thermal shock. Here we can do with these systems is actually hold the burner at low fire until we maintain-

Chuck:

Or pilot hold, depending on the flame safeguard.

John:

Keep the burner down on low fire until we maintain some minimum water temperatures, minimum pressure before we release the modulation. And then one of the more significant benefits of linkageless solution is that it is very difficult to tamper with. So if you have an end-user who tends to want to futz and play and every time you come back there to do a tune up to find things a little amiss. You can relax and enjoy in that a lot of the linkageless controls today are pass worded. There are serial numbers for the actuators which make it very difficult to change the actuator out by accident and affect the combustion setting. So there is a lot of technology on the software side that prevents some of the more common problems from occurring.

Another benefit as we get into linkageless controls is that we can actually assign a different ignition point from a low fire point. Picture in your mind the jack shafted solution again. When the actuator returns to low fire, it can't go any lower than low fire. Low fire is low fire so that is essentially where your ignition occurs. Well, many times the burner can operate at a lower low fire than it can be lit at. So essentially you have to increase your firing rate just enough to get a stable, safe, smooth uneventful ignition which are operating point can often times be less. So where you have a turndown limitation and turndown means essentially the difference between your high fire input and your low fire input, you want to maximize that generally. Where you have a very limited turndown quite often the burner can be made to behave better via operating with a lower low fire. Where you have a mild heating demand let's say in your spring or your fall or your process requirements in the morning or night are such that the boiler is really grossly oversize. What is going to happen is the boiler is going to fire. It is going to satisfy based on temperature or pressure and it is going to shut down. It is going to do that more frequently with less turndown. So if we increase the range of firing, what it will allow is the burner to run longer at a lower firing rate before we satisfy our temperature or pressure controller and what that means to you is energy savings. Because remember every time the burner is going to fire, it is going to go through a pre-purge cycle, a post-purge cycle and really all you are essentially doing is pushing the air through the boiler during those pre- and post-purges that you just paid to heat. So that boiler instead of becoming a generator of steam or hot water actually becomes a radiator so we eliminate some of the cycling associated with the burner by increasing the turndown. That is essentially what we are looking at and we have had some instances where the fuel/air ratio savings was paling compared to the increase in turndown. It was very beneficial for the customer.

So we maximize burner efficiency. In some cases, perhaps you have seen these were boilers again don't have characterizable trim on the fuel control. What that means essentially is you are continuously playing with ball joints, the radius of a ball joint from a damper pen. You are playing with where the pushrod in the in the ball joint. Essentially, you are changing the radius of the linkage, the characterization of the linkage, to match the fuel and the air. Unfortunately, on boilers that are fitted with no characterizable trim, you really do hit the sweet spot at one point on the curve. By curve, we are talking about the range of travel from low to high fire. Unfortunately, you are living with a compromise situation as the firing rate is either called to increase or decrease. Unless you have an awful lot of time and a good deal of load and remember you need that when you are setting your boiler up. Unfortunately, if you don't have a lot of heating load, the boiler is continuously turning off as you satisfy the operating control but if you get to that point where you can put that much time into it you can probably hit it at a few points. Ultimately, going to the linkageless technology allows you to hit the sweet spot in terms of fuel/air ratio and emissions continuously from low to high fire. It is a lot easier to do than playing with the linkage and suffering through the hysteresis and the fact by the time you are in your truck that it's probably working less optimally than it did an hour before. Linkageless offers these benefits in terms of maximizing efficiency.

There are applications where we fire multiple fuels. It is very common. These systems in every case can be set up, as we seen actually in one of the other pictures, to operate natural gas, fuel oil. The simplest linkageless system from Honeywell can handle two fuels here so if you have a vaporized propane backup it can certainly do that. Some of the more exotic systems from Fireye can have up to 10 servos. You can have one for air combustion air maybe one for flue gas recirculation and eight different fuels. Not sure we would ever use something like that but the capability is there should you need it. Keeping in mind the fact that when you fire, especially fuel oil, you typically would set the boiler burner up on fuel oil first because the fuel oil is going to be a little bit harder to ignite at the lower firing rate so that is a session you can establish your low fire. After you get that done you execute your startup on gas. Unfortunately, you further limit the turndown on natural gas there because your strap damper settings have been established by fuel oil firing. Some people get around that by having multiple damper setups when transferring between gas and oil which makes the operator have to relocate linkage to fire oil versus gas. Going linkageless we get rid of all of that. So essentially, if you tell the control system that you are firing oil, the servos arrive at their new positions which were established at startup. If you are firing gas, those home positions kind of change based on that need. It simplifies life for the operator. We can have multiple fuel curves, one for each, or in the case of the Fireye system that we will talk about later, multiple curves there for servo combinations.

Chuck:

I can't stress enough in that duel fuel applications, this is where you can really increase your bottom line on fuel efficiency and energy efficiency because these separate curves that are available for both air and gas. It exponentially increases the fuel savings.

John:

So looking at applications-

 

 

Chuck:

Yes, what we are going to be talking about here is boilers ranging from as low as 50 hp up to and we have done boilers up to 60,000 pounds per hour steam boilers. It really all depends on the application and how they are used. Whether it is a process application, how often the boiler is used during the day. In some applications, John mentioned, it wasn't an energy savings so much as it was the amount of times in a day that the boiler turned on and off. In that application, we had boilers turning on and off in a four-month period 20,000 times because of the way they were sized and the loads that they saw. Just reducing that to five or six times a day, provided them with a ROI to put a system in like this.

John:

It was actually interesting because Chuck just recently had a flame safeguard event where we had a mechanical programmer in place. The thing was worn out. They really couldn't figure out why. It retrofitted it with a flame safeguard from Honeywell that actually told them the number of cycles. They started watching that and that is what kind of uncovered that opportunity. We put it in and greatly dropped the number of cycles per day.

Chuck:

Yeah that a lot of times is an overlooked feature of the linkageless controls, the increased turndown is just huge to be able to have the boiler running at lower areas of the firing rate curve. As far as expected results that you should see, we have seen everything from 4 to 10% fuel savings on the boilers. That is with I would say the increased turndown on the boilers.

John:

And some of that has to do with just getting rid of the linkage. Some of it has to do with the fact that the boilers in some conditions were not tuned for while. Some are the type of trim used for the fuel/air ratio controls so we kind of cover all that.

Chuck:

Okay, now what we are going to talk about in the next slide here is a culmination of everything we have talked about in a graphical form and here we go.

John:

So essentially what we see here, after the animation is done, dollar sign, there you go. Is that when the boiler is initially commissioned or when it is tuned, the person doing the work will use a combustion analyzer and find the sweet spot over maybe four or five points from low to high fire and will set the fuel/air ratio to where he or she believes it needs to be to maintain safe combustion. But that is pretty much a snapshot in time, right? The person is there. We are watching it. We set it up. We leave it where it needs to be but understanding that the linkage through time is going to wear the person will probably leave some excess air in the combustion process to ensure that we don't make unduly great amounts of carbon monoxide. What we end up with is the blue curve, now fuel is on the left and air is on the bottom, the blue curve is ultimately where we want to be but understanding that with time there is going to be slop and changes in the combustion equation the person will leave some excess air in there. The difference between the optimum and where it is going to end up or where it is, is opportunity for dollar savings in the form of reduced fuel consumption. What we are trying to do by using the servos with the high resolution that they have and get rid of the linkage and making everything is tight and follows the way you want to be is eliminating that slop, getting rid of that margin between where we wanted to be and where we have to leave it in the mechanical sense.

Now we are going to talk a little bit about one solution from Honeywell and we will be addressing a few. This is a real simple solution from Honeywell. It is called there ControLinks system and it was essentially designed to replace the linkage. The OEMs in the boiler world were really the first to see this. Honeywell worked with the OEMs and they said essentially we want something really inexpensive, real simple. We want to just get rid of all this crazy linkage that everyone battles with. We can offer all of our customers now as a checkbox option a nice solution from the factory that just does what we want it to do and it's relatively inexpensive. So that is how we are going to start here and we will work up from there.

 

Chuck:

As John said, Honeywell worked with a number of OEMs. Critical markets that they are focusing on and actually both Fireye and Honeywell, range from hospitals to heavy industry to schools to an industrial process. It really touches again, like I said in a couple slides previously every boiler is like a snowflake. Every application is different and you really need to look at it from an aspect of how am I running my boilers and how are they operating might hit or my steam plant and how can I make them better.

John:

And this covers a lot of opportunity.

Chuck:

Yes, it does. As I mentioned, again previously, we are going to be referencing the catalog here. If you do have a catalog, the Honeywell ControLinks are featured on page 39 and 40 of the catalog. These are actual catalog cut sheets that a brief description features and part features to be able to make your selection of parts and spare parts easier. To get a little more detail on what we just looked at there, the system as John said is very simple. There is a wiring sub base, a controller, a number of actuators that control everything from air to gas to oil to FGR and then a display. The real trick is getting them installed properly and getting them configured properly which we have access point and we have contacts throughout the country that can help you with that.

John:

Really what it consists of is this is more of how the parts interact. So, on the left-hand side-

Chuck:

And this is more inclusive of how a linkageless system integrates into a boiler whether you replace that flue box in the middle with a Fireye part or the Honeywell controller like we are talking about here.

John:

Sure. So specific to the ControLinks, Honeywell manufactures a relatively inexpensive color touch screen that can be used to not only monitor the ControLinks operation but it can used to configure it as well. Or if you wish to operate the system without a display, you can use your PC with some software and come in with a RS 45 link and commission the ControLinks that way. We find though more often the benefit to the display is that it allows a lot more interaction with the controller. Many people like to have that there left all the time. That talks down to the controller. It is kind of the brains of the system if you will and it operates our actuators. In this picture for example, flue gas recirculation, one for straps or combustion air, one for natural gas and fuel oil. It interacts with your existing flame safeguards so whether this is a Fireye system or Bionics or Honeywell, whatever it happens to be as long as it is a full function programmer it will work and handshake properly with the Honeywell ControLinks. On the right-hand side, of course, you see your traditional level controls. There can be any number of different safeties and limits in here. In this picture, we are showing Honeywell's integrated pressure control. It does your modulation, your high limit and it does your operating control functions all in one piece. Essentially the only thing to be careful of in the ControLinks world, is that the ControLinks wants a 4 to 20 milliamps signal representative of demand. So where you have the old Honeywell series 90 controller, we can either adapt that through an analog rescaling module, give a setting of 4 to 20 milliamps signal or preferably you to replace it with a device like this and it does everything in one neat kind of block.

Chuck:

One thing that I wanted to add is John mentioned that the controller works in tandem with the flame safeguard. There is a product from Fireye and one from Honeywell that incorporates the flame safeguard into the controller as well. I just wanted to bring that up if we talk about it, I don't want to get anybody confused.

John:

Sure and in some cases the flame safeguard has been retrofitted. There is no sense in reinvesting in it. In other cases where it just makes more sense to just gut it and start over, we can provide a solution that integrates the flame safeguard. Next thing we are going to talk about briefly is the Honeywell solution for your higher-level applications and I wish I had a picture of the internal event but I guess it is kind of slim. I doubt you'll be able to see it but essentially the Delphi system is the opposite of the ControLinks. This is designed with flame safeguard in it. It has got a Honeywell HC 900 or they call it their ABC 900. It does the parallel positioning internally. It is much more powerful platform where we can do level control, trap control, a lot of other stuff that you might find in a common boiler of a little bit larger size. It has got a PC on the door which we can use for trending as well as set up. It is packaged with a lot of accessories whereas the ControLinks you have to purchase the piece parts to put it together. This kind of comes out of the chute with a lot more with it. For those applications where you might have a larger water tube boiler, you want to integrate some other control functions around the boiler this is often times a better solution.

Chuck:

Right, and if those come prepackaged and panelized so there is no field wiring. It comes ready to hang on a wall. For those of you that are familiar with Tridium, Honeywell owns Tridium and all of the graphics and the display was based on the Tridium software so that is easily integratable to an existing automation system if you have one.

John:

And that is a really good point because quite often people want see now that part of their plant. It's no longer just the functions. They want to integrate the whole operation.

Chuck:

Again, this is a two cut sheets, two pages out of the catalog that we have here explaining again going into detail with the description and part numbers on the Delphi system. The other products regarding linkageless controls that we carry is the Fireye PPC6000 and NX6100 and that is what I'm going to talk a little bit about here right now.

What we have again is the catalog cut sheets from our resource book here that again give the descriptions and details of the PPC6000 which is on the right-hand side and the NX6100 which is on the lower portion of the left-hand side of the sheet. One good thing about Fireye is they really try not to obsolete anything and what you see on the top left-hand sheet here of the page 35 is one of the original Nexus’s 3100 to 4100. They are still available, if you do have those on your boilers, for spare parts but that is one thing that Fireye kind of rest their head on the fact that they really try hard not to obsolete products and they make them available after they have new products designed and come out into the field.

John:

Right, by integrated see on the left-hand side of the page, they are talking about the fact that the flame safeguard is integrated with the linkageless solution whereas on the right-hand side you will see that obviously lacking. Perhaps we will talk about that some more.

Chuck:

Yep, we have the menu here if you will of parts and pieces for the NX6100, PPC6000 that ranges everything from the different type of servomotors you can get to expansion interfaces or O2 trim or additional memory or communications, O2 probes, sensors for temperature and pressure. We try and give you as much ammunition as we can as you were looking through and figuring out what you may need or again so free to give us a call and we will be happy to help you out.

John:

One of the things I just wanted to mention Chuck, on the Honeywell ControLinks you needed an external pressure controller that gave a milliamps signal. In the Fireye realm, we just connect the steam pressure or water temperature transmitter to the controller and it has got its own onboard temperature or pressure control. So you don't need the external modulating control because it's integral.

Chuck:

Great, thank you John. Okay, we are going to look at the PPC6000 which relates very similarly to the Honeywell ControLinks. It works in conjunction with an existing flame safeguard but some of the differences are that allows you to use a VFD on your forced draft fan and it allows that to be integrated into the control as well as allowing O2 trim. That might be a question that we can talk about at the end of the presentation is when to use O2 trim and how it works. A VFD is very simply a variable frequency drive that we attach into the electrically to the forced draft fan that allows the fan motor to operate from 15-30 Hz all the way up to 60 Hz allowing you to save a great deal of money on the electrical power required to run that fan because typically it is running at 100% but it is very frequently not require to be run at 100% when the boiler is in operation. There is in these systems block programming available to you can do some things. Say you could do water level control and side of the PPC6000 as well as the 6100 as well as PID control is available. Sequencing, doing lead and lag up to four boilers, I will discuss that a little bit, is available off the shelf in the PPC6000. The actuators allow for CANbus communications. One thing with the Fireye that works really well for field wiring and communications is that it's a two wire pair that is daisy-changed from the controller to each actuator back to the controller allowing for simple wiring and operation.

John:

That control area network that is essentially a digital communication protocol so we get some additional benefit from the digital technology in terms of diagnostics and resolution.

Chuck:

And similar to the Honeywell controller is that this does come with as a parts and pieces so we can panelized the parts and pieces to fit your application as required.

John:

Or you can purchase it loose depending on your in-house time abilities.

Chuck:

The Fireye Nexus 6100 is again they are higher-level linkageless control system and it provides the flame safeguard already integrated into it. Very similar features to what the PPC6000 offers as far as the VFD and O2 trim and a block programming. The one thing that this does offer that the other ones don't is there is a color touch screen and available for this as well. The color touch screen can be used for up to four boilers. You can actually have that color touch screen mounted in a boilers operator’s office if you wanted. You could use that as a master and have little displays out at each boiler so that you can see and trend and look what is going on with your boiler and your boiler houses.

John:

It returns your investment over four boilers instead of one.

Chuck:

Exactly, as I mentioned previously we are going to talk a little bit more about VFD's and here you have in the picture on the right, I apologize for its clarity, or pictures of what our VFD's ranging from smaller horsepower to larger horsepower focusing on the combustion air fans there. And then you see the actual small display in the pitcher from Fireye or the Nexus. It is the display on the very right-hand side of the gray control panel put in there. Leading and lagging, this is something that Fireye offers on their linkageless control packages is a lead and lag package that allows for up to four boilers to be controlled and rotated through. So you make sure that everyone gets the same amount of run time and that your load is spread out throughout the four boilers.

John:

And also too in case a boiler should happen to fail, you don't compromise maintaining steam pressure or water temperature. The next boilers simply sequences right into cover for first so it keeps you seamless.

Chuck:

Okay, what we are going to go through now is an actual installation. We have a number of pictures here starting with a boiler that has nothing done to it other than it probably has been run a really long time.

John:

It looks old.

Chuck:

It looks old and what we have here is real simple. On the left-hand portion where I have got my mouse, we have our module actuator that has a linkage going down to the radial growing out of the jack shaft out of the radial arm as well as moving over to the oil metering valve and it is going also to the gas. This is a great example of a boiler you could probably save a lot of energy on. There is a close-up shot of the oil metering valve with the characterizable trim right there and the reason I have the close-up of this is that we are going to show another close-up in a few slides here that shows the servo attached to it with a field developed bracket.

John:

What is interesting here in this picture because it is so close and can see a better is that you will see there is a number of sensors here and the sensors are essentially what are adjusted during a tune up to characterize the fuel/air ratio. You can see a person has got a fair amount of mechanical work to do there when they do this set up initially.

Chuck:

Just another shot of the actuator with the jack shaft coming off it going down to the radial arm and moving over to the oil. Okay, we have started our installation. A couple changes here, there is a small kicker panel that is mounted to the left of the main control panel and the display is mounted in there. We have the jack shaft removed from the entire system along with the actuator or a mod motor I should say. A little bit further along, the display is on. It is mounted, it's in, it's running, you can actually see the color on it. You notice from each of the actuators you have a number of pieces coming through it. There is a separate connection for control voltage as well as for power for the actuator. That is one area where the Fireye actuators and the Honeywell actuators differentiate is you have the two wire pair of going from each one, each actuator to the controller for the Fireye. For this when you have specific home runs for each actuator to the controller.

As I mentioned again previously, here is the oil metering valve and we have the servo mounted to it with a field developed and made bracket. Every oil metering valve, the way every one is mounted and used can almost be like a snowflake depending on the boiler and the burner that it has. The one thing that Honeywell leaves up to the installation is a way to figure out and have a bracket made for that meter. So that is going to have to be done in the field. A close up here again of an actuator attached to a gas butterfly valve with the separate connections like I mentioned earlier.

John:

And those are a little bit more generic so Honeywell does offer a bracket kit for their V51 butterfly control valves and through the drilling quite often you can make it fit with the eclipse valve as you see here.

Chuck:

The wiring is pretty much done. The display is powered up and it is running and operating. You can see there is a bit of a curve put in there but I would say it is a pretty rough curve but is just in there to kind of get the boiler up and running and moving.

John:

So what you will find is during the ignition process you will see crosshairs literally moving across the screen to show you where you are at and after ignition you will see those crosshairs move up and down the curve as the boiler response to the demand in the plant. There are diagnostics across the top that tells you what is going on in a glance, very nice to have.

Chuck:

And there it is completed. Now that is not the boiler that we were looking out but pretty much summarizes what we were looking at with an actuator on the left on the left here for the air. We have one on here for the oil. There's one down below for the gas and then finally we have the kicker panel with the color touch screen for operating the boiler and viewing where you are at in the curve.

A couple other areas in the boiler room and on a boiler that you will probably want to look at focusing on here, is upgrading your flame safeguard. John mentioned before that the products we offer are flexible enough to be able to provide with integral flame safeguard or without integral flame safeguard. Depending on whether you already upgraded your flame safeguard, we can work with you and provide a linkageless system that works with that. Or you may want to look at upgrading your flame safeguard and having it separate from your control. We mentioned VFDs. VFDs can be used the combustion air fan. Another good place to use VFDs is on feed water pumps. There is a savings there that is can be quite huge depending on how everything is sized and the physics and how the boilers are used versus how they were designed. In some applications gas meters on your boilers are desirable depending on how you need to meter out and you need to look at how your gas is being used depending on if it is going to different parts of your building or different jobs or different processes. You can actually have your gas meters going into a building automation system so you can look at how you are using it and how your boilers operating at different parts of the day or for different projects or for different customers.

John:

Cost assignments or in some states where it is mandatory to measure fuel usage and trends, that is available.

Chuck:

Steam meters so you know how your boilers running and why you are producing at anytime of the day. In some cases, gas detection is important as well as paperless recorders. May also want to look at bringing your building automation system into your boiler control but paperless recorders are a good way to actually gather data from steam flow, gas flow, efficiency, water temperature and have it sitting there for EPA, DNR or just doing simple efficiencies on your boiler.

John:

Or to actually watch and see the efficiency change over time and maybe clean up the tubes of heat transfer efficiency. Those things change in time and it gives you a baseline to see where you were. These products are all in our solution catalog where the flame safeguard is in the front part, the combustion section. You will find the rest of those items various places in the catalog. Just take a look at the index if you would.

Chuck:

Okay, now this is kind of an important screen as well. These are all questions that should be asked of you if you're looking at putting a linkageless system on your boilers or questions that you should be able to answer in order to be able to develop an ROI or to understand how your boilers are being used in your facility. If these questions are being asked, you need to think about who you're talking to there.

John:

It is kind of a long list that is somewhat intimidating but these solutions although as generic as they can be from a manufacturer, at some point need to be somewhat tailored to your specific application. These give you some starting point to think about.

Chuck:

Yeah and if anybody would like to e-mail me, I have my e-mail on the next slide, I can't forward this one to you so that you can really hold that near and dear and be able to answer some of these and start think about it. Okay, we are getting close to the end here. Just one more slide after this. Again my name is Chuck Kudy. I am a territory manager here for Industrial Controls. I have my cell phone on the screen. If you have any questions please feel free to give me a call. Also I have my e-mail address there. More importantly, in the yellow box there, if you would like a copy of this presentation please feel free to e-mail us or get a hold of me or just call or e-mail moreinfo@icdmail.com. We would be happy to come to your facility and do a presentation or we can have somebody come out and do an ROI and take a look at your boiler and help you understand if it is a good candidate for this. Or if you want an ICD catalog, again, like I mentioned in the beginning please call or e-mail and we would be happy to get one out to you. But I do appreciate your time and I thank you very much for investing your time this morning and if there is any questions we would be happy to take them.

Jennifer:

Okay, thank you guys. At this time I will read some of the questions that came through. We received a question from Tim. He asked can you put a linkageless system on a boiler with multiple burners.

John:

The answer to that question is yes. It depends on the solution but for example for a ControLinks fits very well in multi-burner applications where each burner has been fitted with the separate combustion air damper and fuel control valve. So essentially what is done is each burner is sat up and optimize by itself and then the opposite is done for the other boiler burners. You get them all set up the way you wish and they operate in tandem.

Jennifer:

Okay, great. We also received another question from Kyle. He asked can these linkageless systems be integrated into building automation system.

Chuck:

Yes, they can. As I mentioned before with the Honeywell Delphi, that is a Tridium based so that is a pretty easy integration. As well as with the ControLinks which has RS45 communications protocol that can be used and you can port data up into a building automation through that. Then with the Fireye gear, that is modbus going up into building automation system so yeah that can easily be done.

John:

So a modbus is really the form for the Fireye and the Honeywell so it is pretty readily accepted.

Chuck:

Yes.

Jennifer:

Okay, we received a question from Richard Cromer. He is raising his hand so Richard I am going to un-mute you and you can ask your question directly. Richard, are you out there? Richard? Okay, we will move on to another question then. We received a question from Bob? Can we get simple ROI?

Chuck:

Yes, we can provide a ROI, a simple ROI for you and I can work with a customer on that. But real simple, we are looking at how many hours a year does the boiler run. We are looking for what are its firing rate, average firing rate, and cost of gas and then there is the horsepower of the boiler. We can figure out a simple ROI for a customer on that, yes.

Jennifer:

Okay, we also received another question from Samuel and he asked can a boiler be placed on manual to slowly build pressure after maintenance?

John:

Absolutely, in the case of the ControLinks for example we can either do the low fire hold meaning the modulation will be inhibited until we hit some minimum water temperature set point. Or also in the case of ControLinks, there is an auto manual input on the controller which when placed in manual allows you to modulate burner position with a manual potentiometer. So if you want to be that low fire after repairs are made, you can do that and then slowly walk it up until you build temperature and pressure. Or at some point when you are comfortable, you have maintained your minimums. You can just release it to modulation, so yes. In most cases that is friendly to the guy doing work on the mechanical side of the boiler. Good question.

Chuck:

Thank you, great question.

Jennifer:

Alright, so at this time it looks like we are out of time. If you missed any part of today's presentation, we will post a recorded version on our website which is www.industrialcontrolsonline.com and it will be under the online training section. Within the next couple of days we will e-mail a link to the video and our contact information if you have any further questions or feedback for future webinars. Also, we will be running another webinar based on steam trap application and maintenance on November 3rd. That is a Wednesday. On that note, I would like to think everyone for attending and we look forward to having you back soon.

John:

Thank you from us as well.

Chuck:

Have a great day guys.



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