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Boiler Upgrades that will Save Fuel and Energy on Industrial and Commercial Boilers from 50 HP and UP!

Video: 
Wednesday, May 12, 2010 - 10:00am

Boiler Upgrades that will Save Fuel for the Fall Heating Season  Boiler Upgrades that will Save Fuel for the Fall Heating Season2

                                                             $$$$$ 6-18 Month ROI $$$$$

Cleaver Brooks  AO Smith  B&W

Topics Covered:

  • How the traditional “jack shaft” mechanical linkage system works
  • Why the “jack shaft” linkage is inefficient and wastes energy
  • What a typical boiler efficiency curve looks like
  • What the “linkage-less” system looks like and how it works
  • Why customers that have upgraded are saving 5% or more on their natural gas/oil bill
  • Actual projects that have been completed, before and after results
  • Other places to save energy in the boiler room

What You Will Learn:

We will review how the air/fuel ratio system works on your boiler, and why a “jack shaft” system is inefficient and wastes energy. You will also learn why mechanical linkage systems can be adjusted to match your boilers’ efficiency curve. This webinar will help you understand how the “linkage-less” system works and how to determine if your boilers are a candidate for 4-10 % fuel savings.  In addition, we will discuss how to estimate your energy savings and how to get started on a project.

Who Should Attend:  Project, Process, Energy Management, and Boiler Room Engineering and Maintenance Personnel at:

  • Hospitals and Medical Centers
  • Universities and Colleges
  • Chemical Plants
  • Commercial  buildings
  • Schools
  • Food Manufacturing Plants
  • Pulp and Paper mills
  • Plastic and Textiles
  • Heat Treating Facilities that have Gas Fired Furnaces and or boilers
  • Engineering and Consulting Firms

Jennifer:

Hello everyone and welcome to the webinar. My name is Jennifer Adlestein and I am the marketing assistant for Industrial Controls. Today’s webinar is boiler upgrades that will save fuel and energy on industrial and commercial boilers from 50 HP and up. The presentation will take about forty-five minutes and after we will take some time to answer your questions. During the presentation, feel free to enter your questions into the chat interface on the right-hand side of your screen. We will also open it up to voice questions where you can raise your hand but this option is only for people with phone connections and not those using their computer microphone. Now we are going to hear our panelists.

Our first speaker is Bill Hopler. He has a BS Degree in Electrical Engineering from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. He worked for 13 years as a sales engineer for Honeywell’s Process Management Division, and has worked for Industrial Controls for the last 14 years. Bill teaches customer seminars on Flow Technology, Industrial Wireless Solutions, and Gas Detection.

Our second speaker is Chuck Kudy and he has a Business degree from Carroll University. Chuck has been with Industrial Control for 10 years. Chuck’s primary focus has been to leverage new technology to help customers improve their energy and process efficiency.

Our third Speaker is Bob Thomas and he is a Honeywell Combustion Control Specialist.  Bob graduated from college with a BS degree. After 6 years in the Army he joined Honeywell in Memphis, TN. From there he traveled to Los Angeles, CA, and to Philadelphia, PA, where he currently is based. He has been with Honeywell for 34 years. At this time, I will pass the presentation off to Bill.

Bill:

Thank you, Jenn. I am in our New Jersey office, the Industrial Controls office in New Jersey. Chuck is in Milwaukee and Bob Thomas is with me in New Jersey. I think we have got a good subject here today. We had 110 people sign up so what does that tell you about energy cost today. Before we go through with our seminar presentation, for those of you who know Industrial Controls and maybe those who don't, we do have 17 offices in 22 states. We have got a really nice website and after the webinar you can go on to our website and see some of the documents we talk about today. Previously this year, we have done a number of webinars on process instrumentation. We did one on pH. We did one on temperature. Last month we did one on industrial gas detection. We have got a whole range of control valves some of which fit nicely into the boiler application but today we are going to focus on combustion controls. One of the nice line cards I like to show people when I go out for the first time and Chuck I think you probably like this too, is this little line card that is specific to the solutions around boilers. For years we have been doing valves and gauges, instruments, flow meters, recorders, flame safe, flame safe upgrades, blow down valves, fuel valves, damper controls, etc. but one of the things that Chuck and I and Bob have noticed up until three or four years ago which is when linkageless controls systems came onto the market place. Every time we would go into a boiler house, we would see the famous jack shaft and those of you on the phones that are familiar with the jack shaft you will know what we are talking about. Those are not, it is a very important concept because it develops the wreathing behind the mechanics and why this linkageless control system can help pretty much anyone with a 50 HP boiler or more to save some pretty serious energy. To the best of our knowledge, we think that 95% of existing boilers out there have jack shaft systems and they fit pretty simple. They've got a rod here that controls at the same time the fuel/air ratio or your gas valve and also for your combustion air and that is what you depend upon in order to control the balance of your fuel/air ratio in the chamber of your boiler. That is what we see when Chuck and I go out and do applications, phases, and start ups and what we finish up with and what we will talk about today is a retrofit. This is Cleaver Brooks 300 HP boiler that we did and now you see that all the linkages are gone. We have replaced those with electronic actuators for both fuel and for the air and you are going to see in a few minutes how powerful that is in the ability to control your boiler at the ideal combustion rate at all loads. So with that I would like to turn it over to Bob Thomas of Honeywell to update us on the Honeywell fuel/air ratio system which was the first on the market to actually introduce a linkageless system.

Bob:

Alright, thanks Bill, thanks a lot. What is linkageless fuel/air ratio control or parallel positioning? What you see on the left is what we are more typically looking at today which is the foot mounted actuator driving both the fuel and the air. Whereas on the right, those links and cans single foot mounted actuators have been replaced by direct coupled actuators and we will see this slide again later. The older type of technology was acceptable when energy costs were low and people weren't too worried about it. However with the new type of technology really should be used, must be used when energy costs are high. Also it has a green effect of helping protect the environment. So why use linkageless controls? As I mentioned, most boilers have mechanical linkage systems with one foot mounted actuators positioning both combustion air and fuel at the same time. You will see in a later slide that this really just begs inefficiency whereas the linkageless system replaces that single actuator with separate direct coupled actuators for air up to two fuels and flue gas recirculation if required. Flue gas recirculation, however, can also be used as a fourth channel actuator and we will see that on a later slide where it's on a Gordon Piatt burner with a secondary air sleeve. So what are the benefits of this? Closed and more precise firing rate control over the entire firing rate of the burner. Uses improved 4-20 mA controller operation over the old slide wire 135 ohm. Can incorporate low fire holds to prevent short cycling and boiler thermal shock, very important during startups of course and it is password protected so once the curve has been set as you'll see in a little bit no unauthorized readjustment can take place.

For increased turndown, typically right now mechanically linked systems use the same point for light-off and low-fire. However, many burners are capable of operating at a lower rate of fire than light-off. You typically see mechanically linked systems with an optimal turndown of 3:1 and that can be increased up to 6:1 using ControLinks. After then short cycling the burner reduces fuel consumption. One caveat however it is always important to check with the equipment manufacturer to make sure their burner is capable of operating at this lower turndown rate.

Chuck:

Hey Bob, this is Chuck. I just want to emphasize that short cycling is a real energy saver where if you can minimize and reduce the amount of times I've boiler is turning on and off in the day depending on your curve cycles, that can really save a lot of energy for the customers out there.

Bob:

And I believe you have a slide that speaks of that later in the presentation, correct Chuck? Okay, going back to why I use linkageless maximization of burner efficiency. Mechanically linked systems are typically only under maximum efficiency at one point on the curve and then you have to compromise efficiency to get reliable combustion to the curve. ControLinks can have 24 points on the curve so you do maximize the efficiency throughout the curve and we have got a slide later on that shows you the challenge of trying to match a mechanically linked system to a combustion curve and then the difference in efficiency you will see when you use direct coupled actuators.

Chuck:

So everybody out there that's not familiar with what a curve is. Essentially it is an X and a Y axis that plots out where your air and fuel is at any point on an X and Y axis from low fire on the bottom left-hand up to high fire in the top right-hand corner of that curve.

Bob:

As I said before, ControLinks does have a green component to it by reducing emission gas and also by using flue gas recirculation. That helps reduce nox emissions. Finally for those of you who have dual fuel, mechanically linked systems typically require readjustment or combustion air when switching fuels. This may or may not get accomplished. Time restraints also mean that efficiency is not achieved when setting up the burner with mechanically linked systems. With ControLinks, however, you can set up to independent fuel cars. One for gas, one for oil so when you throw the switch from gas to oil or vice versa, you are actually moving to that particular curve that has already been established and you reduce commissioning time by 30%.

So what are typical applications, 50 hp or greater boilers typically 10 to 15 years or older compliant with safety standards ASME CSD-1 or NFPA85, single or dual fuel. The key improved efficiency results in about a 4 to 10% reduction in fuel usage and as Chuck indicated you can improve your turndown.

What are the different markets and we have examples of these later in the presentation talking about how the ControLinks has been applied. You can see hospitals, schools, office buildings, etc. and you can read those. To the right, you see two systems. ControLinks, which has been around for a while which we are discussing today and a relatively new system called Delphi which incorporates O2 trim which gives you another 1 to 3% fuel efficiency. These are typical boiler manufacturers that these things have been applied to.

Now this is the important thing. This is the exciting part and that is the energy savings. We are going to try to imagine a combustion curve and I will say out the front end it takes a while for this thing to pan out. The important thing to remember is no two combustion curve are typically identical because the application of the burner to it and its various burn rates. You will find differences between the curves. As this thing comes up right now, you began to see what the challenge is in trying to match mechanically linked systems to this combustion curve.

 

Chuck:

And it is never a linear curve, right Bob?

Bob:

That’s correct, never linear. Alright, as this thing fades from view, we will see a mechanically linked system applied to the combustion curve. As I said, this is the challenge. Because you're using a one foot mounted actuator to drive both fuel and air, you can typically only set this thing up at one or maybe two points along the curve for maximum efficiency. This is the mechanically linked system that we were talking about. You can see the foot mounted actuator down at the bottom left driving both the, that happens to be a jack shaft, the secondary air sleeve control and you can see there that it is also mechanically linked to the combustion valve. Now as we try to match air and fuel with a single foot mounted actuator, you see we can get pretty good at one point, through the high fire point. Now we are coming down and you see how we are having to compromise efficiency in order to set this thing up for a good fire. Typically what is going to happen here is a guy will come in with his stack analyzer. It points along the combustion curve where he is trying to eliminate things like CO, maximize efficiency. Typically that is what it looks like and that's about as good as it gets.

Now let's take a mechanically linked system and replace it with direct coupled actuators and you see how all that has changed. You can see where the combustion valve now, butterfly valve is sitting with a direct coupled actuator, that's right. If you come across there, that's for the secondary air sleeve and then down at the bottom is the air damper. If you look at the other side of this burner, you'd also see one of these things sitting on an oil metering valve. Here we go. So now let's see what a curve would look like with these high precision motors. You have your fuel valve and your air damper being controlled individually and that’s the 7999 controller. These blue dots you see dropping down on the combustion curve are actually points that they set up person would be establishing as he moves along the curve with his stack analyzer. You can see we can get a fairly precise control. There are only a few spots a long we curve that beg additional efficiency but because we can do that we can eliminate those spots. We see the additional points being added and actually you can put up to 24 points on the curve which is where you get your very high precise control. We will add one more point to take care of that. You will see we have fairly well aligned ourselves with a combustion curve and we haven't even taken a look at increasing turndown by lowering the minimum modulation point. That is what we are doing here. You see where light-off and minimum modulation tend to be the same with mechanically linked systems. This gives us the ability to actually go below the light-off point with minimum modulation.

What does this mean to us, to you? Savings, obviously, improvements in boiler emissions, increase energy transfer and improved efficiency. You get an idea here just the amount graphically of dollar savings that are available to you. However, what really is interesting is what happens over time as links slip, ball joints get loose. The opportunity for energy efficiency and for energy savings is significantly higher.

What are the components of this system? There is a 7999 controller which is the brains of the system. It sits on a sub base where all the wires are pulled in. It controls up to four parallel positioning motors, direct coupled actuators and then you can set this thing up where either software or S7999B color touch screen display. Where does it sit? You can see where ControLinks is in the limits string upstream of the programming controls. You can actually use this with any incent to programming controls right now. You can see it controlling up to the four actuators.  This taking the 4 to 20 mA firing rate control input from the pressure control you see at the top right. And now I'm going to turn it over to Chuck.

Chuck:

Okay, Bob thanks a lot. I really appreciate that, great explanation. What I am going to be taking a look at here is the before and after pictures of what a boiler looks like with the jack shaft and as it goes through the installation process of putting a Honeywell ControLinks on. The first thing we are going to take a look at here is that foot mounted actuator that Bob had explained in some previous slides here. Off that foot mounted actuator, we are controlling a jack shaft coming off the right-hand side going underneath the air fan and motor. It's controlling the radial arm for the air and it is going over to the oil metering valve. The one thing that is not showing here is the gas valve that is being controlled. Okay, a little bit of a close up picture here of the oil metering valve. One thing to know, you do have the characterized oil valve that is going to be replaced and you are going to see that in a future slide with the servo for the Honeywell ControLinks system. It is characterized so that does give some flexibility on the efficiency of the system but the servo that is going to be put on in replace of this is going to be a lot better.

Here is another slide from each side of the foot mounted actuator again. We get a better view of the radial arm damper and coming off of the jack shaft for the foot mounted actuator. To this point nothing has been done on the boiler. These are just before pictures kind of bringing everything together from what we talked about. Now here is where some work is getting done. The foot mount actuator is now gone. If you notice all the linkage is gone. We started to mount the kicker box on the side of the main panel with the sub base or the Honeywell ControLinks controller. The flame safeguard is out. It is being upgraded right now. It's going to have a new RM7800 in there. The one thing that you want to take note of is at the oil metering valve here we started to put the bracket on in the field, the field applied bracket for the oil metering valve.

Okay, a little bit further along in the installation here we have the actuator mounted for the radial arm air damper. You will notice a number of conduits coming out. The conduits are for the control wiring and for the power wiring for the actuator. Up on top you see the kicker box that the color touch screen display mounted in it. It looks like there has been some programming done on it, looks like there is a curve on it already. Flame safeguard on the panel right next to it and if you look right underneath the fan cover, you see the servo that we are going to take a look at I believe in the next slide for the oil metering valve. There is the oil metering valve with the servo mounted to it and again the field adapted bracket that is put in place. Again we have the conduits coming out for the control wiring and we have the conduits coming out for the powering wiring for the actuators.

Here is the gas valve that we spoke about earlier that we couldn't see. Now you can either replace the gas valve in its entirety or you can just put the servo on the gas valve itself. In this case, it looks like we just provided the servo on the existing gas valve. Another close-up picture of the color touch screen display, it already looks like there is a small curve already installed and commissioned on the display here. We are getting close to being completed with the installation. And there it is completed. This boiler obviously isn't the first two we were looking at but this is a great representation of what it looks like after. You have the conduits all coming back to the junction box that has been installed. The linkage is completely gone and ready to operate for the customer for a long time.

Bob:

Alright, this is Bob again talking about valve proving. Valve proving is a system in which you replace the normally open vent valve in the double blocking and bleed with a pressure switch. Then by staging the opening of the two main valves you can monitor pressure to test the leakage if any of the valves. What does it do for you? It saves on utility costs, natural gas escaping from a leaky or stuck open vent valve during burner firing. The vent valve should be closed. Safety, which is really the key driver here, each burner cycle tests to identify failing valves avoiding a potentially unsafe condition. We mentioned that you replace the vent valves so you eliminate installation and maintenance costs associated with vent valves and piping from a traditional double block and bleed. One thing to keep in mind here is that local regulations may not permit this so you have to be sure. And finally, reduced emissions, reduces natural gas escaping from a leaky or stuck open vent valve during burner firing. This was particularly important to a job I did a number of years ago where the EPA was coming around advising the customer that they were emitting too much into the atmosphere so this provided an alternative to them.

And finally just a quick commercial on Delphi, the new combustion efficiency panel. This panel combines the flame safeguard control, fuel/air ratio control, the option for O2 trim, the option for VFD control all into one prewired panel. This is actually a subject training session in itself but I did want to make everybody aware that it is out there for those applications requiring O2 trim or VFD control.

Chuck:

Okay, thanks a lot Bob. This is Chuck Kudy again here in Milwaukee and Bob did a great job on tackling a lot of the basics for the linkageless controls in the previous slides to this. At Industrial Controls, we work with a number of different manufacturers Honeywell being one and Fireye being the other one. What I'm going to do is take the opportunity to talk about the Fireye version of the linkageless controls which is the PPC6000 and the NX6100 which have a little bit different fit you than the ControLinks and the Delphi which helps us address some additional customer needs.

 First I'm going to talk about the Fireye PPC6000. This is very similar to the Honeywell ControLinks. It works with an existing flame safeguard. It does allow for the use of a VFD on the combustion air fan if required and O2 trim if required. It is a very flexible system. You can add it later on if you choose and elect not to work with it but you decide three or four months down the road that it would be good, it is there for you to use. There are block programming and PID loops available in the controller itself so you are allowed do things like drum level control or boiler feed water control or draft control inside the controller itself. It really is a nice, tight compact system. Sequencing and lead and lag our standard for up to four boilers inside the PPC6000. I am going to talk about VFD and sequencing a little bit later on in the presentation to kind of stamp it a little bit more but there is another way you can really take a look at saving some energy is understanding how your boilers are used in your facility and sequencing them properly and leading and lagging them properly. From an installation standpoint, Fireye PPC6000 offers a CAN bus communications. Real simple CAN bus is a cable that has four or five wires in it that carry power and control voltages through the bell and cable and they are all daisy-chained together. There are no home runs required. The parts for the Fireye PPC6000, MC6100 I'm going to talk about, do come loose and we can panelize them. So again, it provides flexibility for customers or installers that have room in an existing control panel. They can put this in the existing panel or we can provide them already panelized with a drawing of the panel we are providing or if required in a lot of instances a new set of boiler control drawings. Okay, you can move onto the next one please.

The Fireye NX6100 is pretty much a carbon copy of what the 6000 is except for two very big differences. Number one, the flame safeguard is provided inside the controller already so if you have an existing outdated or obsolete flame safeguard, you can buy the 6100 and it provides that function and feature for you. You can also have as an option a color touch screen available. That color touch screen allows certain control flexibility. For instance, if boiler control room is 20 or 30 or 40 feet away from your boilers, you can put this color touch screen inside of the boiler control room and you can look at and view and see what is going on with up to four boilers at a time while you still have a display now at the boiler or operation and going out and taking a look at it every hour or so.

I said before that I was going to talk about variable frequency drives and lead and lagging again. I just want to reiterate, fans running at 100% can eat up a lot of electricity and a lot of costs. Now I know that fans come boilers can run from 4 or 5 hp but depending on the size of your facility you can look at 50, 60, 70 hp fans which again can eat up a lot of electricity and a lot of costs. In variable frequency drives on the combustion air fans are a very good thing to take a look at seriously doing for you and your electricity bills.

Bob:

And Chuck we are seeing ROI's on some of these VFDs to be as short as three or four months.

Chuck:

Oh yeah, without a doubt and one thing you don't even think about, cost is one thing but it also makes your boiler room a lot less noisy. If your fans are running at 40 Hz or 30 Hz compared to 60 Hz which is 100% a lot of times which is an unseen advantage to working with them as well. Here is the other part that I wanted to stress a little bit more. The leading and lagging of the boilers and sequencing them, making sure that your boilers are working for you and you are not working for your boilers. They are there, they are an instrument to make your processes run better and if you are leading and lagging properly and sequencing them properly, you might be a will to save a whole lot of money and reduce a lot of gas costs and electricity costs. But you are still keeping your process people happy or your customers or tenants, whatever it might be.

Bill:

Thanks Chuck, so what we like to do now is take five or 10 minutes and share with you some of the experiences we've had. We've done several dozen linkageless control system products and all of our branches in the Midwest and the Northeast. We have done jobs for people like Cadbury Schweppes, Pepsi. We did more than one job, in fact we are seen as more and more, Pepsi actually has an energy tsar. His goal in life is to get with the plants and make them send up request to corporate for energy savings projects and the ControLinks and the Nexus we have talked about is a perfect opportunity to do that. Guests packaging, Schindler elevators, we have done universities. Chuck is going to talk about some school districts he did in Green Bay and Madison and a data center and also a medical center. The Cadbury Schweppes job was a project I was personally involved in and one of the things that we find on these projects is almost everyone we have found by being out there in the boiler room with our customers looking at other things like flow meters, drum levels or flame safeguard upgrades. And 95% of the time we have brought up the subject of linkageless controls, even though they have been on the market for a couple of years. This is why we are doing this webinar. People haven't seemed to grab onto the capability and understand what the benefits are of putting in a linkageless control system. So at Cadbury, which is now known as Dr. Pepper, they make Orangina and YooHoo at this plant at two 300 hp Cleaver Brooks’ boilers, gas-fired. We put into Honeywell ControLinks systems. Found during the site walk and the initial survey that their flame safeguards equipment was obsolete so they said since we are going through the job to put in the new Honeywell 7800 flame safeguard controllers, upgrade the pressure switches. This particular customer also wanted to take the opportunity to put in steam and measure the steam that he sent out to his process. Also in New Jersey now, the NJ VDP has a requirement that all boilers over 5 million BPUs per hour must have individual gas meters. At the same time, this customer went and had us put the gas meters in and the steam and gas meters actually fed a Honeywell paperless recorder which every month sends up the fuel usage over customers network to tell them what gas and steam usage they used during the previous month. In this particular case, we actually got involved in doing the installation and the startup but we've always worked a lot with individual contractors.

Chuck:

Great, thanks a lot Bill. I am going to talk about a school district up in the Green Bay area of Wisconsin. Their overall focus was to reduce energy costs in the building. It didn't matter what it was they wanted to look at it. What we have done over the last 2 1/2 years is provided close to 30 ControLinks systems for the admin buildings and school buildings in the district. As we prepared for this, we started asking some questions regarding energy savings than they were a little hesitant to give exact numbers but they said and they were happy to express that they saved. In the one school they did their audit in total savings of 40%. Now that is not totally attributable to the Honeywell ControLinks. That is really focused on updating their building automation, VFDs, high-efficiency motors. They really looked at the lighting in some cases. They really looked at the entire spectrum but they said that the ControLinks was a real big part of that for them.

The next application I want talk about was in the Madison area, the school district in the Madison area. Again, they were driven to reduce costs within schools and they are saving money. They have up to 10 buildings that have 1 to 3 boilers in that that have been updated but the real important thing here is I wanted to express and when I started talking to the customers was that Industrial Controls went in and helped train the maintenance department and focused on getting them on their feet so they could be self-sufficient. Honeywell was gracious enough to come in and do some training on the commissioning standpoint so it was a real team effort here. They are completely self-supporting now and they are up on their feet. They are working great.

Here is a real interesting case. This is a case where energy wasn't that big of a deal at first. Our customer decided that they needed to upgrade their old and obsolete flame safeguard with the new RM7800, great idea. They put the display on it and with the display they got the opportunity to see how many times their boiler was turning on and off and on and off and on and off. In a three-month period after the installation they noted that the boilers cycled on and off close to 25,000 times. Their concern was what am I doing to my boilers by turning them on and off so much. As we started to talk about it a little bit more, how much energy am I wasting by these boilers purging trying to relay up to 200 times a day. So we took a look at a couple different options. We actually took a look at new burners because the burners appeared to be oversized but that was not in the cards at the time. So the next thing that we took a look at was Honeywell ControLinks because it gives the opportunity to really dial in and dial down the air and the gas to a point where they turn down was acceptable and now they're only running four or five times a day. They have a number of different buildings that they are looking at putting the Honeywell ControLinks in.

The last facility that I'm going to talk about is a medical center here in Milwaukee. Again, they were driven to reduce energy costs that were a mandate. They pretty much looked at everything else they could do and energy seemed like the next available step. We put the system on in December. It was on as it says here a 1960s era B&W water tube. Typically what they did through the heating season is they would change their lead boiler to any one of three and lag the other ones in as required. But since this one was running so well, they decided and it made perfect sense, to have this one running lead all winter long and lagging the other two. So what we are doing now is we are in the process providing a proposal for another boiler to upgrade that and get that going I think in the next couple months here.

Bill:

So those are the installations or a short summary of the ones we have been involved in. What our customers are telling us is that they are seeing savings and ROI's in the area of 5 to 18 months. When you looked at the linkageless versus the jack shaft type system, I think most companies out there from a capital standpoint are pretty happy with five and 10 and 12 month ROI's and even 18 months are very attractive. This seems to be the general flavor of what we are seeing out there in the marketplace on the jobs that we have done. The other question that we always get, okay how much is this going to cost. So what we found depending on whether it's ControLinks or Nexus Fireye we are talking about 8 to $20,000 per boiler installed and that's without O2 trim. That will give you an idea of the ROI and cost per boiler to implement and I think you'll have to agree that is quite affordable. So other solutions around the boiler that we wanted to remind you of, one of course is flame safeguard. We do both the Honeywell and Fireye flame safeguard and John Dempsey from our office always reminds me to tell people please don't buy refurbished flame safeguard controls. They do not meet the insurance company requirements so be careful when you buy those upgrades. We talked about VFDs. We have several brands of VFDs, Yaskawa, Siemens, GE and others. Gas meters, this is one of the gas meter technologies with no moving parts that we use on the NJ VDP requirements. They meter gas into individual boilers. We do steam meters, work meters and other technologies. Gas connection, based on some of the recent incidents both in Connecticut with clean energy where they had a natural gas explosion and down at the Slim Jim Plant in North Carolina where they had a similar incident. The NFPA right now is working on a new code that is going to require boiler room operators to include gas detection and Honeywell has got a real nice gas connection product to fill that need. Paperless recorders, we are seeing a lot more people put them in because they can be networked on the customer's plant. Network, the one job that I talked about that John just finished a new one in Morris County where we put in 17 gas meters all networked for the customer job site and each month they recorded automatic e-mails the end-user of what the gas usage was for that previous month so he can report and be compliant with the new NJ VDP regulations. So those are things that we do around the boiler room.

What is the best boiler room profile? We have done single boilers by themselves. We have done multiple boilers. It seems like 50 hp seems to be the starting point for ControLinks. You need to have modulating control which is straight on/off boilers. The system that we talked about is not going to work. A customer that uses boilers can generate steam for process or for heating are both we find good opportunities. And of course customers that want to save money and fuel on fuel which is pretty much everybody. So the jobs that we have actually done and then gone back and done calculations we are seeing 6 to 10% of savings. Again, that gives you that ROI 12 months or below. So lastly, when Chuck or I go out or Bob Thomas or we go out Honeywell or Fireye guys, these are kind of the questions that we seek out so if you're interested from what you have heard today start thinking about these kinds of things. Are your flame safeguard controls obsolete? Do you have mod motors? Pretty much 95% of you have jack shaft on the fuel/air ratio. Get some of the part numbers together but if you don't want to go through that we can just send you out this little survey form or if not Chuck or I or one of our fellows will actually come out with this form. Take the day to come back, get back to you with the proposal and with the suggested or estimated fuel savings. This is what we do as a company and we find that people appreciate that. We are not just a hardware supplier.

That pretty much ends our webinar today. We appreciate your attendance. Here is some contact information. Chuck's information in the Midwest, my information here in New Jersey, you can e-mail either of us. You can call either of us. If you would like a copy of the presentation material, if you would like for us to come out and do and energy savings presentation at your site for your management, we are happy to do that. Or if you would like to have an engineer come out and actually start a survey and see if you are a good candidate for this linkageless system, we are happy to do that. The best way to get in touch with us is to either call us or e-mail us at moreinfo@ICDmail.com. That information will then be given to our closest branch office to your location.

Jennifer:

Okay, thank you guys. At this time I would like to read some of the questions that came through. We did receive a question from Jeff. If the points on the curve are programmable, why don't they more closely resemble the curve?

Bob:

Well, actually the points on the curve do mirror the curve once they are set up. I think you solve one of those slides, we had 24 points, or not quite that many but we had several points that wind up right on top of the curve. That is determined by static analyzer.

Bill:

In that particular slide, Jen, the curve of the ControLinks actually painted over the combustion curve so that is an exact match of 24 points of the ControLinks adjustment on fuel/air ratio and it basically blanketed the combustion curve so you couldn't even see it anymore.

Bob:

It was the mechanically linked curve that only linked up to two points.

Jennifer:

Okay, we received another question in from Dan. Is this retrofit approved by all boiler manufacturers and does these retrofit affect active warranties?

Bob:

It is approved. That is not to my knowledge affect any warranties. I have not had any problems with it at all.

Chuck:

Yeah, I will jump on top of that. A lot of the applications where we install ControLinks or the Fireye Nexus systems are on a lot of boilers that are actually out of warranty and they are older. We have done a number of boilers where they are maybe I think the newest one was like two years old. That didn't affect the warranty at all.

Jennifer:

Okay, so we got a question in from Tom. How long does it take to install a linkageless on a boiler?

Chuck:

That is a great question. I work with both end-users directly installing this equipment and mechanical contractors. I tend to be a fairly conservative fellow when I'm talking about installations and stuff like that. So I break the installation into four steps- demo, physical install, wiring and commissioning and startup. So for the demo which entails taking off jack shafts, oil metering valves, taking off the foot mounted actuator. I usually put in half to three quarters of a day physically reinstalling everything. Probably another half to three quarters of a day wiring, I tend to really want to take my time wiring the system into the existing boiler controls that are there so I usually put in three quarters to one day. Commissioning and startup is about a half a day so you are looking at about three days total for install. I have customers that do it a lot faster than that but as you gain experience and comfort with the system it will quicken up but usually about three days.

Bill:

Good job, Chuck. It is interesting one of the reasons we decided to do this webinar here in May and not wait for the heating season is that there is still enough time do the analysis, get a proposal submitted for funding and still get the job done in a matter of days during the summertime so when heating season comes up here October, November your boilers will be up and running with the linkageless control system and you will be saving that fuel that we talked about.

 

Jennifer:

Okay, we received another question in from John. Can you use the VFD on the combustion air instead of the damper itself? It seems like you would have better control and would ControLinks support that?

Chuck:

You are putting the VFD on a combustion air fan. Again, ControLinks does not support a VFD but the Delphi system does.

Jennifer:

Okay, we've got a question and from Robert. Is there a class for installing these controls and set up?

Bob:

Typically, the classes are held locally by the distributor involved in the Honeywell rep.

Chuck:

Same thing goes for Fireye. We have done it locally. We have done it on a job site or they do have a training class in Derry New Hampshire or over in Iowa.

Bill:

If you interested in that, just send us an e-mail at moreinfo@ICDmail.com and we will get that to the proper branch in our company and we can advise you as to whether a training class is scheduled or maybe we can do something special for at the actual end user site.

Jennifer:

Okay, great, we've got a question in from Ed. How does this display hold up in the hot environment of a boiler room?

Bob:

That is a very good question. The system is very robust. Certainly you can't lay it right on the boiler. You might have to have the panel removed from the boiler itself. That is more typically for vibration issues. Again, it's very robust and takes the heat very well.

Bill:

As you can see by applications that we talked about, the actual jobs we have done pretty much in every case that screen is actually mounted in a panel on the boiler front.

Chuck:

Yeah, just piggybacking on that with the Honeywell display it does have a sleep function to so it's not on all the time where you might see some burnout on color touch screens. The Nexus systems with its standard display is just like the E110 display with a vacuum fluorescent display so if that holds up in the boiler room so does the Nexus one.

Jennifer:

Okay, we got another question in from John. Where can I get information to upgrade my old flame safeguard control?

Bob:

You can get that from your local distributor or Honeywell.

Bill:

Or go for a website or pick up the phone and call the nearest branch. We are very good technically particularly when it comes to upgrades and we have all of the collateral from both Honeywell and Fireye to share with you the wiring updates, the base is required in all the advanced information to make your upgrade as smooth as possible.

Jennifer:

Alright, so we seem to be out of time today. I wanted to let everyone know that if you missed any part of today's presentation we will post a recorded version on our website and within the next couple of days we will e-mail you a link to the video and our contact information if you have any further questions or feedback for future webinars. But like Bill said, you can always e-mail moreinfo@ICDmail.com and someone will get back to you. So I wanted to thank everyone for attending today and we look forward to having you back soon. Thanks guys.

Chuck:

Thank you very much guys.

Speaker(s): 

Bill Hopler has a BS Degree in Electrical Engineering from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. He worked for 13 years as a sales engineer for Honeywell’s Process Management Division, and has worked for Industrial Controls for the last 14 years. Bill teaches customer seminars on Flow Technology, Industrial Wireless Solutions, and Gas Detection.

Mike Handler is a Honeywell Combustion Controls Specialist.  Michael graduated college with a degree in Air Conditioning Technology and Design from The State University of New York at Farmingdale. Michael has worked in the HVACR Industry for over 36 years and over 22 of those with Honeywell. 

Chuck Kudy has a Business degree from Carroll University. Chuck has been with Industrial Control for 10 years. Chuck’s primary focus has been to leverage new technology to help customers improve their energy and process efficiency.

Bob Thomas is a Honeywell Combustion Control Specialist.  Bob graduated from college with a BS degree. After 6 years in the Army he joined Honeywell in Memphis, TN. From there he traveled to Los Angeles, CA, and to Philadelphia, PA, where he currently is based. He has been with Honeywell for 34 years.



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